Mindshare beats Carat to €150m SFR media-buying and planning account

August 1, 2012

Word reaches me that Aegis’ Carat has just lost one of France’s biggest media accounts to WPP’s Mindshare. SFR, the mobile phone carrier owned by Vivendi, has a media budget of about €150m (£120m). Overall, it is one of France’s biggest advertisers, ahead of Orange, but behind Renault, with a total budget of about €300m.

For WPP, it’s second time lucky. In 2009 a joint-ticket of Mediaedge-CIA and Mediacom got into the final frame of a review, but was seen off by Carat, which has now been the incumbent agency for about 15 years. OMD and Zenith-Optimedia also participated in the 2009 pitch. It is not known whether other agencies were involved in the current one.

SFR, which offers fixed line, mobile and broadband services, spends the biggest part of  its advertising budget on television – about €92m last year. Next comes outdoor, with a spend of €65m, then digital, with €62m.

Separately, Carat will have been shaken by the news that Joel Ewanick, the man responsible for placing General Motors’ $3bn global media account in their hands, has been abruptly fired by his company.

Earlier last week, John Gaffney, who led Carat’s North American General Motors account out of Detroit, quit the media agency. The circumstances surrounding Gaffney’s departure are unclear. Some sources maintain his departure was related to client dissatisfaction with Carat’s performance. Others more directly connected to the situation insist Gaffney’s exit was not directly related to performance on the GM assignment.


Will Nick Brien succeed in steering McCann off the rocks?

October 13, 2011

McCann WorldGroup is critical to the performance of Interpublic, the world’s fourth largest marketing services group; it provides about one third of its revenues.

Just recently it hasn’t been doing very well, a worrying state of affairs both for IPG shareholders and McCann’s chief executive of about 18 months, Nick Brien.

The fact is, it has not won any major new business under Brien’s stewardship. Worse, it is in deep trouble with two of its core clients, Nestlé and L’Oréal.

Last month, Nestlé expressed the depth of its displeasure by assigning all of McCann’s signature Nescafé business (nearly everything, globally) to rival Publicis Groupe. Reportedly, that’s $25m revenue down the Swanee.

Now comes news that McCann has screwed up its already troubled relationship with beauty house L’Oréal (which, by the way, is about 30% owned by Nestlé).

The Nescafé affair might – might – be written down to bad luck. Clients do move on eventually, even ones like Nestlé that have been with McCann for several decades.

The L’Oréal fiasco (for such it is) can, on the other hand, only be ascribed to McCann’s managerial incompetence. Stay with me, the story’s a bit complicated but bears retailing.

L’Oréal and its Maybelline brand are even bigger business for McCann than Nescafé: together they account for $100m a year IPG revenue, of which 80% comes out of McCann (according to AdWeek).

Historically, the relationship has been somewhat complicated by the fact US creative for Maybelline is handled by another IPG agency, Gotham, although McCann is responsible for adapting and distributing that work throughout the rest of the world.

Thinking, no doubt, that the account could be more efficiently run as a spin-off unit with its own profit and loss account, Brien and his lieutenants have spent the last year, and an enormous amount of money, creating something called Beauty Village.

Beauty Village was set up at the instigation, and with the full collaboration, of Cyril Chapuy – now global brand president of L’Oréal Paris, but formerly in charge of the Maybelline brand.

Client endorsement enough, you would have thought. But apparently not. No one had checked upstairs with the ‘C Suite’ at L’Oréal, with the result that Beauty Village has now had to be razed to the ground, despite all the hullabaloo a couple of months ago attending its launch.

Fairly or not, the buck for this disaster is going to stop with Brien. Already there is innuendo that the former media man has not got the client-handling skills it takes to run an organisation like McCann.

Whether that is actually true I’m not so sure. Media men may be direct rather than placatory by nature, but that has not stopped the likes of Tim Bell and Rick Bendel (formerly COO of Publicis Worldwide, now marketing supremo at Asda) succeeding in more senior roles.

Besides, there may be a silver lining to the cloud now settling over Brien’s head. At first sight the Nestlé and L’Oréal affairs look like unforced errors playing into the hand of Maurice Lévy, head of Publicis Groupe (core clients, both, at Publicis Worldwide). But Lévy has troubles of his own, with the Nestlé relationship at any rate.

For one thing, he has just lost Carter Murray, his key Nestlé point man, to WPP – which poached him as president-CEO of Y&R Advertising North America. Murray managed to raise Nestlé to Publicis’ premier and most profitable client.

For another, Lévy appears to have overplayed his hand by winning the £250m Ferrero European media business last month. Yes, it’s only media and, yes, a small part was already handled by PG media arm Zenith Optimedia. But now that Ferrero has upped the ante, Nestlé is feeling distinctly uncomfortable about sharing a media agency with its most deadly European rival.



Chinese corruption probe extends to Publicis media operation

September 14, 2010

In the global village, there’s nowhere you can hide – for long. A spreading corruption scandal in the little-known Chinese city of Chongqing (population about 35 million) will be causing the worldwide media bosses of Vivaki Exchange (Publicis Groupe) and OMG (Omnicom) some sleepless nights. It’s a cautionary tale about using Chinese brokers as intermediaries in media negotiation. All the main global networks, with the exception of WPP, use one – though not necessarily the same one. They broker the client rather than the media owner.

Last week, the chief executive and number two at Publicis’ buying point in China, Vivaki Exchange, left (or more likely were forced to leave) abruptly. Vivaki Exchange is an on- and offline amalgam of Publicis’ Solutions Digitas, Starcom MediaVest and Zenith Optimedia, formerly known (in China) as China Media Exchange (CMX). The reason for the two executives’ departure?  Warren Hui (left) and Ye Pengtao had had dealings with a media broker called Chongqing Huayu, which operates in China’s so-called South Western markets (Yunan and Sichuan as well as Chongqing itself). Chongqing Huayu is owned by a certain Zheng Zhixiang, recently arrested by the police in connection with the Chongqing Hilton prostitution scandal (highlighted here in the Daily Telegraph). The allegation is that he had been using the media broker to launder money from the prostitution racket. If convicted, Zheng will probably face the death penalty.

According to well placed sources, the broker Huayu (unusually in China, I’m told) owes money to the two buying points: perhaps Rmb100m (£10m) in the case of Vivaki Exchange; the amount owing to OMG (which uses the same broker) is unknown. Whatever the exact nature of the shortfall, it will now be impossible to make good, owing to the scandal. As a measure of how serious the situation is, both Hui and Ye were interviewed by the police on September 4. They were released after 48 hours, but told not to leave the country pending further investigation. I understand that police enquiries have extended to the general manager of Pepsi’s bottler in south-west China. Pepsi is Huayu’s second largest client. Media buying is handled by OMG via OMD.

China is one of the fastest developing advertising markets in the world. Asia Pacific, of which China is the largest component, will overtake North America in size by 2014, according to recent research sponsored by Starcom MediaVest. China’s ad market is already nearly as big as that of Western Europe.

UPDATE 13/10/10. OMD China has “let go” its managing director of five years Winnie Lee and replaced her with Siew Ping Lim, formerly of WPP-owned Mindshare, who holds the upgraded title of ceo. Lee, who “does not have a clear plan at the moment“, will leave next month. Is her departure by any chance related to the above events?

FURTHER UPDATE 23/11/10. More evidence of stress and strain at OMD China. OMD’s Johnson & Johnson global account director, Ben Jankowski, who relocated to China in June – because, he said, it was the place to be – has quit. He is crossing the line to become global media head of Mastercard early next year. Team turmoil is said to be the cause.


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