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Yes, we Cannes: WPP, McDonald’s and McKinney grab top Effie Index rankings

June 18, 2012

It might seem counter-intuitive to announce the global Effie ‘Effectiveness Index’ winners at the Cannes International Festival of Creativity but then, as my colleague Stephen Foster points out, Cannes has become such a monster event it serves as global launchpad for virtually any marketing services event these days. So, before becoming immersed in a week-long self-congratulatory orgy of advertising creativity, let’s just remind ourselves of those advertisers, brands and agencies that actually bring home the bacon:

  • Unilever is the most effective advertiser;
  • McDonald’s is the most effective brand;
  • WPP Group is the most effective advertising holding company;
  • Ogilvy & Mather is the most effective advertising agency network;
  • Ogilvy & Mather (Mumbai) is the most effective individual agency office;
  • McKinney (Durham, North Carolina, USA) is the most effective independently held advertising agency.

Yes, I was wondering about that last one, too. It recently appeared in ‘The Pitch’, AMC’s unscripted programme in which two agencies vie over 7 days for  a piece of business, in this case Subway restaurants. McKinney won. It’s notable for its Audi A3 campaign, Art of the H3ist, which garnered two Effies and a Cannes Lion. And also for something called “connection planning”, which I take to mean an integrationist skill that ensures campaigns work smoothly across all channels.

Good for McKinney, I say. But I do have a qualification. Last year’s winner in this category was the slightly more universally recognised Wieden & Kennedy of Portland, Oregon. Now, I’m all for merit making its way to the forefront without having to await Buggin’s Turn. But I also look for consistency in results. The Effie Effectiveness Index, which is sponsored by insight portal WARC and compiled from 39 individual national Effie competitions, was only inaugurated last year and therefore lacks granular historical perspective. That said, there is a repeat winner this year: McDonald’s, with the most effective brand accolade. Here, for quick reference, is last year’s roll of honour:

  • Procter & Gamble was the most effective advertiser;
  • McDonald’s was the most effective brand;
  • Omnicom was the most effective advertising holding company;
  • BBDO Worldwide was the most effective agency network;
  • Sancho BBDO (Bogota, Colombia) was the most effective agency office;
  • Wieden & Kennedy (Portland, Oregon, USA) was the most effective independent advertising agency.
I don’t suppose that Sir Martin Sorrell will be worrying too much about historical perspective, as he wipes the blood away from his nose. One way or another, WPP has collared most of this year’s top Effies. So, he is worth it, after all.
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Strong Interpublic financial results swell optimism in global ad recovery

February 24, 2012

Things really must be getting better in the global advertising economy, the cynical might observe. Interpublic, the world’s fourth-largest and most financially challenged advertising conglomerate, has just reported a decent set of Q4 results.

Despite a heavy kicking from principal clients SC Johnson – which quit after decades at IPG subsidiary DraftFCB – and Microsoft – which withdrew all its media strategy and planning business from media powerhouse Universal McCann – IPG was able to report profits (net income) up nearly 40% (50 cents compared with 36 cents per share) on revenue slightly ahead at $2.07bn.

Admittedly IPG chief executive Michael Roth was wary of calling a recovery. “We have some local wins and some existing clients spending money, but I wouldn’t say that the recovery is taking hold and we’ve seen bottom,” he said during the conference call.

But that cautious scepticism was surely belied by his assertion elsewhere that the company is setting out on the acquisition trail.

Besides, a slew of uplifting data elsewhere seems to suggest that IPG’s positive figures are not an isolated anomaly. Publicis Groupe and Omnicom, respectively numbers 3 and 2 in the world, have already posted Q4 results ahead of analysts’ predictions. WPP has yet to report, but there is no evidence the results will be grim. On the contrary, I have every reason to believe pre-tax profits and revenue will be well ahead of analysts’ expectations.

More circumstantially, but no less significantly, the US Advertiser Optimism Index – roughly equivalent to the IPA/BDO Bellwether Report over here – has just reported the second-highest level of confidence in ad budgets being raised since 2008. The index, published by research company Advertiser Perceptions, measured the sentiment of advertisers and agencies during October and November.

Finally, UK-based WARC has just produced a report suggesting America is leading the world out of (ad) recession. “Marketing spend in the Americas increased sharply in February,” it noted in an update to its monthly Global Marketing Index. Even doldrum European ad markets are experiencing “improving conditions”, it seems.

Let’s hope IPA/Bellwether doesn’t spoil the party with its next quarterly report, which must be coming out quite soon.


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