Buckle your safety belts: GM has put Joel Ewanick in the global driving seat

December 21, 2010

You’ll have to forgive me. Unlike former Porsche marketer Joel Ewanick, I don’t live in the fast-lane – meaning, I’ve just caught up with the news that he has been appointed to the new position of global chief marketing officer, General Motors.

Even by his standards, that was quick work. He only joined the organisation eight months ago as US vice president marketing, after a brief and apparently stormy sojourn at Nissan. But what an eight months that’s been. The relentless cutting-edge of the whirling dervish has left no department intact, no slogan unchallenged, no strategy unexamined, no agency relationship unmarked. Most notoriously, it will be recalled, he summarily despatched Publicis Worldwide only weeks after it had won the $700m Chevrolet account, and replaced it with (off-roster but on-message, so far as Ewanick is concerned) Goodby Silverstein & Partners. Then, judging perhaps that he had gratuitously made an enemy of one of the most powerful admen in the world, he placated Maurice Lévy by firing BBH from $270m Cadillac and giving the business to Fallon instead. I’m sure there were other reasons for this move: but it cannot be entirely coincidental that Fallon is wholly owned by Publicis Groupe, of which Lévy is the ceo, whereas BBH is only 49% owned by the same company. More money, then, into the main exchequer.

Any way, back to Ewanick. There are at least two, not entirely contradictory, ways of looking at his brand of marketing management; the success of his current appointment will depend on which is uppermost.

The first we have already seen: the change agent on steroids who will stop at nothing to become the world’s most famous car-marketer, in a vainglorious attempt to salvage the apparently unsalvageable: GM’s reputation.

The second is a man with an indisputable reputation for turning around troubled car marques. He did it at Porsche Cars North America during the nineties (no fly-by-nighter there – he stayed nearly nine years as general manager marketing); and he did it again during his 3-year stint as head of marketing at Hyundai North America. Hyundai is now – arguably – America’s most successful car brand.

In this new role we’re going to discover whether success has gone to Ewanick’s head or not. According to the man who appointed him, GM CEO Dan Akerson (himself a new kid on the managerial block), he “will ensure consistent global messaging fro all brands including Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, GMC, Holden, Opel and Vauxhall. Ewanick will provide oversight for global brand enhancements in the markets in which they are sold and work in association with the regional presidents in countries where GM has partnerships and joint ventures.”

The key regional bosses we are talking about here are the ones with dominion in Britain (Vauxhall), Australia (Holden) and Germany (Opel) – Ewanick already controls the rest. And the key issue is how much these brands desire, or even require, “consistent global messaging” – still less an American-centric version of it. Let’s not forget that these were the successful bits, devolved from GM’s incompetent Detroit management – the bits that didn’t have to go into Chapter 11 a while back. I wonder whether Ewanick has the forbearance to acknowledge that. Somehow, I can’t imagine tact is his number one quality.

Whatever happens, it’s going to be an interesting ride for GM’s European roster agencies. DLKW Lowe, McCann Erickson, Scholz & Friends and Amsterdam Worldwide, fasten your seat belts.


Phil Rumbol lays his reputation for creativity on the line

September 8, 2010

For months it has been an open secret that Phil Rumbol, former Cadbury marketing director, was plotting to set up an advertising agency. The trouble was, most of us were on the wrong scent; the idea being he was going to head the London arm of Omnicom’s creative boutique, Goodby Silverstein & Partners.

At the same time, there were ominous rumblings of discontent at Fallon, the creative outpost of SSF, which also runs Saatchi & Saatchi London. Fallon – once highly praised for its Sony Bravia and Cadbury work – has latterly been dubbed “Fallen” by industry wags who, no doubt, have in mind the successive loss of the £70m Asda account, Sony, and the transfer of the £100m Cadbury account to Saatchi after some controversial Flake work went awry. The talk was of a possible management buyout. In the event, it is chairman Laurence Green and creative director Richard Flintham, rather than the agency, who have walked.

What we had failed to do was mix these two things together and make an explosive compound. All the more so since the story – broken by my colleague Sonoo Singh, editor of Pitch – has self-detonated in the very week that Saatchi & Saatchi celebrates 40 years of success in its party of the decade.

Details remain sketchy. We don’t, for example, know what the breakaway agency is to be called, nor whether it has any business. Kerry Foods has popped into the frame, specifically the Wall’s sausage brand. If so, it must be a gift from Saatchi.

Whether that’s the case or not, what’s really interesting about this start-up is the key role being played by a former client. Rumbol, so far as I can make out, has never worked in an agency himself, but he has had a distinguished career as a client, which has resulted in some memorable advertising. Boddington’s Cream of Manchester campaign was one of his early achievements, he was the Stella client (need I say more), and the commissioning force behind Cadbury’s Gorilla and Eyebrows campaign, not to mention the more controversial launch campaign for Trident chewing gum.

Rare is the client with such a creative pedigree. Possible examples: David Patton, patron of the Sony Bravia “Colour like no other” campaign; Simon Thompson, long-time sponsor of Honda ads such as ‘”Cog” and “Grr” ; and – long ago – Tony Simonds-Gooding, who tore up some unsupportive research and gave Lowe Howard-Spink the go-ahead with ‘Heineken refreshes the parts other beers can’t reach’. Rarer still is the client who is physically involved in a start-up and prepared to put his reputation, and possibly career, on the line; as rare in fact as hens’ teeth. It’s said that Rumbol earlier got close to signing a deal with Goodby, but that the stumbling block was the creative process, which would be shipped out to HQ in San Francisco. I can well believe it. Here’s someone who clearly has the courage of his convictions.

POSTSCRIPT: Spookily, Fallon has just conjured a new chief executive out of the hat, after a 6-month search. She is Gail Gallie, who was responsible for the BBC becoming Fallon’s first client in 1998.

PPS. It has been pointed out to me that the nearest precedent to Rumbol is the revered John Bartle. Oddly enough, Bartle himself was a Cadbury client. He worked at the confectionery and food company for eight years and, among other things, fostered Boase Massimi Pollitt’s celebrated Smash campaign. The significant difference with Rumbol is that Bartle then spent nine years in an advertising agency, TBWA, before forming the breakaway group that set up Bartle Bogle Hegarty in 1982.

UPDATE 24/12/10: The new agency is to be called 101 (not, thankfully, Room 101). The name has nothing to do with the agency’s official opening day, 10/1/11 – I’m told by a reliable source. We have yet to learn whether it has landed a big fish.

Bye Bye American Pie as Chevy leaves Lévy – for Omnicom

May 21, 2010

Blimey, that was quick. Publicis Worldwide barely had time to savour its triumph in landing the massive Chevrolet account  – Chevrolet amounts to 70% of General Motors’ sales – before discovering it had spectacularly lost the business to Omnicom-owned Goodby Silverstein & Partners.

The loss of the account, reckoned by one well-placed insider to be worth roughly what the whole of Publicis’ UK office earns in a year, is a huge set-back for group chief Maurice Lévy.

Volt: Battery version vital to GM's survival

Not only is it a hole in the revenue sheet when he, like everyone else, can least afford it, but also a stinging blow to corporate prestige. And yet there was little he could have done about it.

So far as I can make out, this account loss owes little to agency incompetence and almost everything to new brooms sweeping clean. The announcement comes only two weeks after GM hired former Hyundai marketing chief Joel Ewanick as overall  brand supremo, pushing CMO Susan Docherty to the sidelines only two months into the job. Goodby has worked closely with Hyundai which, as is well known, is experiencing a sales surge in the USA. There’s another connection, too. San Francisco-based Goodby was once the agency for GM’s now discontinued Saturn brand.

For Omnicom, the win is a welcome comeback to the car sector. It lost out heavily when Chrysler went into Chapter 11 last year.

GM is now 61% owned by the American taxpayer and is on course for an initial public offering next year, whose object is to pay back some of the $43bn (£30bn) it owes. It has two imminent launches considered vital to its survival: a battery-powered version of the Volt; and a new Cruze small car.

Publicis originally won the business from GM’s oldest roster agency, Campbell-Ewald. Now an Interpublic subsidiary, Campbell-Ewald had held GM business since 1919.

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