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Neogama loses Bradesco, Omo to Interpublic – and 40% of its revenue

January 30, 2013

alexandre-gamaNot all fairy tales have a happy ending. One such is the marriage of convenience between Brazilian hotshop Neogama, its micro-network affiliate BBH and Publicis Groupe. Readers of this blog will recall that, a little over six months ago, Publicis chief Maurice Lévy bought out the 51% of BBH PG did not already own. A useful by-product of the deal was that he acquired not only BBH’s 34% stake in one of Brazil’s hottest agency properties, but the majority shareholding of its founder and creative supremo, Alexandre Gama, at the same time. Neatly, Lévy solved the creative succession crisis at BBH with the same stroke of his pen – by appointing Gama as BBH’s global creative chief, replacing Sir John Hegarty.

Alas, the deal has worked out somewhat better for Gama than for Lévy and Publicis. Gama managed to bank his cheque, but Neogama has just lost about 40% of its revenue, and two of its principal clients. Or so I hear.

It is common knowledge that one of the reasons Gama was hawking his majority stake in the first place was that he feared his agency was too reliant upon a single account, that of Brazilian bank Bradesco. Indeed, rumours soon began to surface that the bank was about to review. Well, now it has: and placed the account with McCann.

For Interpublic, McCann’s parent, Neogama’s plight is, however, a double joy. Another major – this time multinational – client has also fallen into its lap. I mean Omo (“Dirt is Good”), which has moved to Lowe.

In retrospect, we can see this was an accident waiting to happen. As is well known, PG is a Procter & Gamble agency group, and Omo is owned by Unilever. Under the status quo ante, Neogama had an element of protection from client conflict, in that BBH – itself a major Unilever network – was still majority-owned by its founding partners (i.e., Nigel Bogle and Hegarty). All that ring-fencing was swept away by the Lévy deal.

8027388763_a9feed3b19_zIt will interesting to see who gets the blame for this cock-up. My money is on Jean-Yves Naouri, the once but not future king of Publicis.

One thing you can be sure of: it won’t be the Silver Fox himself, who now seems comfortably ensconced in a permanent chairman role, despite recent protestations that he was – at 70 – on the point of retiring.

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The truth about Simon Clift’s exit from Unilever

March 23, 2010

We all know that Simon Clift, chief marketing officer of many years’ standing at Unilever, is stepping down. What’s less apparent is whether the imaginative, regenerative campaigns associated with his tenure are also on the way out. Clift inspired or was responsible for, among others, Dove Real Women, the award-winning Axe/Lynx campaigns and Persil’s Dirt is Good.

There are some reasons for supposing campaigns such as these may be casualties as new Unilever chief executive Paul Polman tightens his grip on the organisation and cements in place a new top team. Polman, in a move unprecedented in Unilever’s history, was parachuted in over stiff internal competition to fill the role somewhat over a year ago. Immediately he came from Nestlé, but the important thing to remember is his 27 years of experience at arch Unilever rival Procter & Gamble. He’s a marketer, Jim, but not as Unilever knows it.

Some commentators see the hidden hand of P&G training in accelerated product extensions and more emphasis on “moment of truth” style promotional advertising since Polman’s arrival. They surmise that action-oriented Polman – who has had a fair degree of success so far – was unsympathetic to Clift’s subtler, slow-burn approach. They detect a more dictatorial, metrics-driven attitude to agencies, which bodes ill for “open source” creativity.

But that view is by no means universal. One former Unilever employee (who will remain nameless, but spent 15 years at the company) sees Polman as a breath of fresh air, sweeping away the cobwebs of “nepotism and empire building”. “The fact was,” the source tells me, “Unilever never was a meritocracy and every move had to be ‘sponsored’ by a corporate elder. Clift epitomised this culture more than anybody.”

So two very different perspectives on the Clift era. Further insights (on a strictly confidential basis) very welcome. In the meantime, there’s more on Polman cracking the whip and changing the guard in this week’s magazine column.


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