Deloitte research gives ITV more impact

August 24, 2010

ITV and commercial television cheerleader Tess Alps (of Thinkbox) will have been heartened by an indisputably solid piece of YouGov research  – not their own, as it happens – which bolsters the traditional 30-second ad spot and trashes the pretensions of its so-called digital nemesis.

Tess Alps: Manna from heaven

The results, distilled from 4,199 respondents on behalf of Deloitte as a preamble to this week’s Edinburgh TV Festival, could not be more on message if Thinkbox had designed them. TV advertising appealed most to 18- to 34-year-olds and least among over-55s. What’s more, nearly 90% of the 18- to 24-year old cohort was prepared to admit that advertising had some kind of impact upon them.

Best of all, for the TV lobby at least, more than half the respondents said television was more memorable than any other kind of advertising medium, compared with 10% who opted for newspapers as their favourite medium and – here’s the corker – 2% for online video ads, and 1% for online banner ads, and ads on iPhones and iPads.

If I were Guy Phillipson or one of his eager team of analysts at the Internet Advertising Bureau, I’d be demanding a recount. I’d point out that there are going to be a lot fewer 18- to 34-year-olds about in the years to come; and a lot more over-55s (who do use the internet, and hold an increasing part of the nation’s disposable wealth). I’d also ask how TV impacts measure up in terms of actual viewing (as opposed to distracted multi-tasking).

Still, there’s no denying that television – according to a significant majority of the population – remains by a long chalk the best brand-building medium.


Two cheers for advertising agencies

April 19, 2010

Mixed messages for the advertising industry in two influential reports out today.

First the good news. Recession is definitely behind us and advertising spend poised for significant growth, according to the latest IPA/BDO Bellwether report. For the first time in two-and-a-half years, a majority of UK advertisers are predicting a return to growth in their advertising budgets. That’s not confined to digital advertising, either. Traditional media is set for a boost, although sales promotion and direct marketing continue to trail. At last, a mentality of cost-reduction seems to have given way to the notion of top-line growth.

More chilling – for ad agencies at least – is the message from the CMO Council’s annual State of Marketing survey, which sifts the opinions of 5000 senior marketers who control a collective budget of over $150bn. Apparently, clients are very disillusioned with traditional agencies’ failure to get to grips with online, viral and mobile marketing skills. So much so that they are now concentrating on bringing data capture in house, or using more specialised agencies. In the words of Donovan Neale-May, executive director of the CMO Council: “You’ve got to look at the difference between the ability to create nifty interactive campaigns and actually having customer data, which underpins everything today…Whereas before the agencies had a huge amount of influence, now the companies are going to have the insights about the effectiveness of these campaigns.” He goes on to note that the likes of Infosys, Deloitte and Accenture are moving into the gap.

So, top-line growth, but not for those with an analogue mindset.


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