Hello from the man who said “Tchau” to StrawberryFrog

March 6, 2013

Alexandre-Peralta-766x1024It’s over a year now since Peralta founder and CEO Alexandre Peralta expunged (literally so) the StrawberryFrog images sprayed all over the interior of his Sao Paulo hotshop. How’s he getting on in the wake of his split with mercurial and moody SF panjandrum Scott Goodson?

The other day I caught up with him and had a chance to find out.

Peralta, it may be recalled, is a copywriter by background who worked at some of the big multinational agencies such as DDB before moving to local Brazilian agency, Africa, as its creative director. When he set up shop with New York-based Goodson in 2007, the idea behind SFPeralta was to provide Goodson’s micro-network with an arm in the booming BRIC market and Peralta with access to international clients.

It didn’t quite work out like that. Peralta did indeed acquire international clients, such as PepsiCo’s snack business – but no thanks to StrawberryFrog, which became increasingly beset by financial and managerial crises. The result was an amicable (well, more or less) decision to go their own ways. Goodson needed the money (he had a 30% strategic stake in SFPeralta, but no managerial interest) and Peralta felt his agency would be better off without him.

Rightly so, it turns out. At the time, the Peralta Sao Paulo business had revenues of about $8.5m and was growing 50% a year. It has won new international business, including Bacardi Brasil (Martini and Grey Goose) and two Mondelez brands (i.e. Kraft of yore); more business from existing clients Pirelli and personal care company Natura; plus Vigor – the Brazilian dairy company giant. So much so that the agency is putting in place for the first time a chief operating officer.

063e7c5The new COO is Jairo Soares, a partner and media vice-president of Peralta these past five years.

At the time Alexandre Peralta dissolved the StrawberryFrog link, his agency was being actively courted by MDC-owned CP&B. Nothing came of that overture, and Peralta Sao Paulo retains its independence. However, the founder remains open-minded on the need for a collaborator:

“An international partner can be welcome in the future if it is capable of improving our portfolio even more,” Peralta tells me.

You read it here first.


Neogama founder and creative chief upsets the BBH applecart by trying to sell his stake

December 19, 2011

There’s an interesting ownership conundrum facing BBH and its 49% sponsor Publicis Groupe. Here is what I have learned.

It concerns Neogama BBH, the global micro-network’s Sao Paulo agency. Its founder, president and chief creative officer Alexandre Gama wants to cash up the majority stake he owns.

Neogama, set up in 1999, is one of Brazil’s top ten agencies and quite a feather in BBH’s cap. It is creatively highly regarded and was the first Brazilian agency to win at Cannes. In fact, if my recollection is correct, it now has at least 18 Lions to its name.

The agency’s biggest single client is burgeoning Brazilian bank Bradesco, but it also plays an important role in servicing BBH global clients such as Unilever and Diageo.

Here’s an example of Neogama’s latest work for Diageo’s Johnnie Walker, which may well be a Cannes prizewinner next year. It was devised by Gama himself:

As you can see, a slick, confident peaen to Brazil, the awakening economic colossus.

BBH, seeking to increase its profile in up-and-coming Latin America, came about its minority Neogama stake in a convoluted way. Back in 2002, Neogama was 40%-owned by Chicago-based holding company BCom3 – the 3 referring to an alliance between Leo Burnett, DMB&B (now deceased) and Dentsu. BCom3 passed on a part of that stake to BBH, in which it by then held a 49%  share through Burnett. Still there? Because it gets even more complicated. Earlier that year along comes Publicis Groupe, which swallows the lot, including Dentsu’s 20% strategic stake, in a $3bn takeover deal, making it the then fourth-largest marketing services group in the world. The important point to note is that PG ended up holding a direct 49% stake in BBH, but only an indirect one through BBH in Neogama. Publicis Groupe CEO Maurice Lévy and Gama are not thought to be best buddies.

Although the subsequent BBH relationship has been mutually beneficial, Gama is known to have been hawking his stake at other agency group doors. Why now? Nine years is a long time to wait for your investment to mature, but some go further in speculating that he is worried about his agency’s dependence on Bradesco as a client.

The sense is that Gama is engaged in an act of brinksmanship with Lévy, which involves using rival groups as a stalking horse. He well knows his own worth: Neogama is far and away PG’s best agency in Brazil (and one of its best in Latin America).

However, buying him out may not prove that easy. If BBH could stump up the cash on its own, that would be the simplest and most elegant solution; but  the likelihood is it cannot. So why doesn’t the parent group just step in and sort it out? Well, PG is not a bank – it will want something in return. Such as buying a majority stake in BBH. The trouble is – PG is also Procter & Gamble’s biggest agency group. BBH is of course a Unilever agency, but the 51% majority stake held by the partners keeps the relationship at arm’s length. Even in this enlightened era of agency conflict management, full ownership of BBH might not go down at all well with the good folk in Cincinnati.

As I say, it’s an interesting dilemma. Let’s see how Gama, Lévy and BBH group chairman Nigel Bogle sort it out.


Supermarkets face ‘greenwash’ crisis over disappearance of Amazonian rainforest

August 5, 2009

DeforestationProblems with the Brazilian Leather Supply Chain sounds a riveting subject for some obscure PhD thesis. You know the sort of thing: A Reassessment of 8th-Century Scandinavian Boat-Building Techniques.

In fact, far from being academic, it’s a subject of passionate interest to some of the world’s leading shoe brands: Nike, Adidas, Timberland and Clarks among them. That’s because they fear a catastrophic boycott of their products if they’re not more vigilant about the leather supply chain.

Their unease stems from an undercover investigation by Greenpeace which has all-too-credibly revealed that leading Brazilian suppliers of leather and beef for products sold in Britain are sourcing their cattle from ranches involved in the clearance of the Amazonian rainforest.

Clearing tropical forests for agriculture produces an estimated 17% of world carbon emissions. According to Brazil’s environment minister, Carlos Minc, up to 75% of deforestation is caused by ranching.

The footwear companies have been a lot more alert to the ramifications of this problem than UK supermarkets. They are asking for an immediate moratorium on rainforest destruction, whereas the supermarkets are still complacent about their alleged involvement.

The real issue is this.  Brand-owners may cleanse their own supply lines, demanding assurance from suppliers that no ‘dirty’ cattle are involved. But it’s a bit like analysing securitised sub-prime mortgage debt. The good gets mixed in with the bad, and no one’s any the wiser because rigorous scrutiny is almost impossible. Even if the brand-owner’s supply line is ‘clean’, that’s no guarantee the same supplier will not provide third parties with ‘dirty’ goods. Which means guilt by association. Wal-Mart and Carrefour have shown the way forward by threatening to fire any suppliers who continue to do business with ranches involved in rainforest clearance.


%d bloggers like this: