Advertisements
 

Smart cookie Microsoft fails to keep track with advertisers

June 11, 2012

Microsoft stirred up a hornet’s nest among US advertisers a couple of weeks ago when it introduced a new version of Bing. Why? Because version 10 of its internet Explorer browser in Windows 8, which accompanied the Bing relaunch, has apparently gone soft on the civil liberties lobby, and set up a nasty precedent for restraint of trade.

Need a bit more unpacking? Fair enough. It’s our old friend behavioural targeting – sometimes called behavioural analytics – that’s causing advertisers’ pulses to race. BT is the new frontier, allowing advertisers to plot an accurate path through our internet interests via specially implanted cookie files (more on this in my earlier post here). Without it, they are flying blind, or rather they are dependent on old-fashioned demographics-based contextual advertising, which is a bit like trying to find your bearings from a soggy map in the open-air cockpit of a pre-war biplane.

Anyway, back to Microsoft. It has embedded a ‘Do Not Track’ functionality in its highly popular browser, with a default setting in the ‘On’ position. And the Association of National Advertisers, the US equivalent of  our Incorporated Society of Practitioners in Advertising (ISBA), is very angry about it:

“Microsoft’s decision, made without industry discussion or consensus, undercuts years of tireless, collaborative efforts across the business community — efforts that were recently heralded by the White House and Federal Trade Commission as an effective way to educate consumers and address their concerns regarding data collection, targeted advertising and privacy. We reject efforts by any provider or other group to unilaterally impose choices on the consumer in this critical area of the economy…”

…. says Bob Liodice, president & CEO, of ANA. Just why ‘imposing choices on the consumer’ is such a bad thing is not immediately apparent. Surely choice is at the core of the consumer society? But we know what he means: Microsoft hasn’t exactly been helpful to the cause.

I have yet to discover whether Microsoft will be inflicting a similar burden of choice on consumers in Europe. UK  advertisers have been breathing a collective sigh of relief now that the tireless efforts of ISBA, the Internet Advertising Bureau and EASA (European Advertising Standards Alliance), which had been arguing for a laissez allez approach to BT, have finally borne fruit. Privacy regulator The Information Commissioner’s Office (director-general, Chris Graham, pictured) has, after much havering, decided that what the new EU ePrivacy directive actually means is “implied consent” to carry on cookie-tracking. Which comes as a huge relief to thousands of website owners, let alone advertisers, who feared they were going to have to bombard users with innumerable trade-impairing pop-up warnings every time they wanted to activate a cookie. “Implied consent”, in other words, firmly shifts responsibility in law from the advertiser and website owner to the consumer.

Not unnaturally, the industry has praised Graham – former director-general of the Advertising Standards Authority – for his “pragmatism”. But doubts remain about what will happen to the British position – which is, shall we say, a unique interpretation of the ePrivacy directive – once it is tested by case law elsewhere in the Community. Doubtless Microsoft’s decision back in the Land of the Free will not be considered helpful.

Advertisements

Buy an IKEA bed and have it away in Thailand. Promise

June 5, 2012

And now for something in the great tradition of Opel cars that break down, but only in Spain – and Pepsi Cola that brings your ancestors back from the grave, if you’re Chinese.

The IKEA Redalen bed, on sale in the global furniture retailer’s recently opened Bangkok superstore, is apparently a lot more seductive in Thailand than Sweden – Redalen sounding suspiciously like a word meaning advanced foreplay. Presumably, the bed can be bought in a job lot with the Jättabra plant pot, which appears to offer seventh heaven into the bargain. Bewildered Thais could not be blamed for attempting to invoke the local version of our Trade Description Act on discovering the products were not, after all, vested with mysterious aphrodisiac powers.

Product names getting lost in translation is an increasing problem for companies as the whole world becomes a potential market. Some other recent corkers:

The Mitsubishi Pajero: the car company noticed too late that pajero means “wanker” in Spanish. It was later renamed Montero.

When Sharwood’s spent millions of pounds launching a new curry sauce in 2003 called Bundh, the firm was deluged with calls from Punjabi speakers who said the new offering sounded like their word for “backside.”

In China, Microsoft’s search engine Bing sounds like “illness” or “pancake” when spoken in local dialects. Microsoft executives expertly changed the search engine’s Chinese name to biying, which also referred to a longer Chinese expression ‘you qui bi ying’, roughly meaning “Seek and Ye Shall Find.”

IKEA’s solution to the problem has been to employ a team of local Thai translators who purge the furniture names of stressful double entendres.


%d bloggers like this: