Why McCann’s Lee Daley wants his life back

Sad to see, if not entirely surprising, McCann Erickson Worldwide chief strategy officer Lee Daley throwing in the towel. Few people can have worked harder at Mission Impossible.

It’s important to note that at the time of Daley’s return to IPG-owned McCann, as chief strategist EMEA, in 2009, the troubled leviathan was under a very different leadership: that of ageing patriarch John Dooner.

Dooner was due for retirement, as he himself cheerfully admitted. The question was, who would succeed him? The most obvious candidates were Brett Gosper, CEO of McCann EMEA, Eric Keshin, the network’s COO, and Mark Dowley, network creative content and entertainment chief. Though popular in varying degrees, these candidates were also divisive. Enter Daley as a potential compromise candidate. He was an old McCann hand, having first joined the London office in 1990 where he rose meteorically to board director level. But he also had wider managerial experience in a variety of rival organisations. In 2001 his career began an odyssey which took him, successively, to WPP as worldwide CEO of Red Cell (later United), group chairman and CEO of Saatchi & Saatchi’s London office and eventually (if briefly) to Manchester United as commercial director.

IPG chairman and chief executive Michael Roth did indeed have a compromise candidate in mind, but it was not Daley. The man who seized the crown in early 2010 was Nick Brien, worldwide CEO of Mediabrands – who had done a sterling job of restructuring IPG’s ailing mediabuying behemoths Universal McCann and Initiative.

Since  when Brien has barely paused for breath in applying the age-old maxim ‘a new broom sweeps clean’. Keshin and Gosper have headed for the exit (though Dowley, I believe, remains).

Daley, in the meantime, was promoted to the network’s global leadership team and his present role – a consolation prize of sorts. Some consolation. In his lengthy resignation letter, reproduced in Ad Age, he makes it clear he hadn’t exactly landed on a bed of roses. The brief was to shore up McCann’s crumbling core clients, GM, Nestlé and L’Oréal. No time for the more rewarding task of pursuing new business – just 80 hours a week in an aeroplane relentlessly circumnavigating the globe in an effort to defuse one client crisis after another.

No wonder he gave up. Anyone would, in the circumstances.

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